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The 'witchcraft' tomb. More details.


Bottesford's effigies

Back in the 1990s one of the first 'major' publishing projects that I was involved with required taking photographs of every sepulchral effigy in Leicestershire and Rutland. All the historicial research had been completed by Maz Wade Matthews. But his photographs were taken on an Instamatic camera. Which didn't focus correctly.

Max and I would take a week off work every May and drive from church to church taking photographs using better cameras. After many years (!) the project was completed. By then it was possible to put a 'web site' on a CD-ROM and hope to sell it (better technology came along soon after... ). (Matthews 2002.)


The most impressive collection of such effigies in Leicestershire and Rutland is at Botteford. There examples of every style from the thirteenth to seventeenth centuries. Locally only at Exton in Rutland has better examples, but there aren't as many.

The effigies are of the Manners family (the Earls of Rutland, with their seat at Belvoir Castle) and their antecedents.


As a quick-and-dirty way of sharing Max's information with you, here are the pages from the CD-ROM about Bottesford's effigies.

William Albini or Robert de Roos (1236 or 1285)

'Fair Maid of Normanton' (14th century)

William de Roos (1414)

John de Roos (1421)

Margaret de Roos (1439)

Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland (1544)

Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland (1563)

Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland (1587)

John Manners, 4th Earl of Rutland (1588)

Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland (1612)

Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland (1632)

George Manners, 7th Earl of Rutland (1642)

John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland (1679)

Thomas White (1698)


If you're not already familiar with these splendid sculptures then do visit Bottesford church.

When you arrive look up at the fascinating gargolyes. One of them is ringing a pair of handbells.

Inside the nave are some splendid corbels and 'springers' in the 'V' of the arches. There is also a rare seventeenth century font.


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To get to Bottesford church you'll almost certainly pass the base of a medieval cross and the remains of stocks and a pillory (or whipping post).


If you think I've got something wrong – or can add additional information or photographs – then please email me:– bobtrubs@indigogroup.co.uk.


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Copyright Bob Trubshaw 2021

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www.hoap.co.uk/barrowby


what's new?


Articles about Barrowby

Barrowby's location and geology

summary of prehistoric Barrowby

summary of Roman Barrowby

Anglo-Saxons

Medieval

Seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

Nineteenth century

nineteenth and twentieth century population

Twentieth century

there's more could be said...

bibliography

index of surnames in Cryer 1979


Articles and web links for nearby places

rare seventeenth fonts at Muston, Bottesford and Orston from Project Gargoyle Newsletter 2020

Ironstone quarries of Leicestershire
YouTube video

Wyville's wells

Harston's Anglo-Saxon carvings

Bottesford's effigies

Grantham Canal Society

The Grantham Canal
All you need to know – and more – from Wikipedia

Croxton Kerrial manor house excavations
photos and brief details from Leicester Mercury.
By 2021 the remains had been consolidated and there are annual open days.

Bottesford History Group