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Wymeswold parish registers 1560 onwards

Wymeswold marriage registers 1560 to 1916


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The Wolds Historical Organisation

The Wolds Historical Organisation (WHO) was founded in 1987 to promote interest in the local history of the villages on the western side of the Leicestershire Wolds, specifically Wymeswold, Burton on the Wolds, Hoton, Prestwold and Cotes.

The WHO is now over thirty years old. Over the decades members have written a substantial number of articles and transcribed most of the relevant records, such as census returns. There are well over a hundred such 'pages' on this web site, all accessible via links on the left-hand side of this screen. The 'search this site' feature (at the bottom of the left hand column) helps find specific information.


WHO talks and trip 19th May, 16th June and 21st July postponed to 2021

Talks in September onwards to be confirmed


WHO updates

If you're not already on the WHO's email update list and would like to receive news of what's happening then please email bobtrubs@indigogroup.co.uk with the message 'Add to WHO update list'. Your email address will not be revealed to anyone else or used for any other purpose.


NEW!

Wymeswold pubs

Thanks to everyone who let me know a copy of T.R. Potter's rhyme about the nine pubs formerly in Wymeswold is now in the pharmacy. Of course… where else?
    The White Horse shall chase the Bull,
    And make the Three Crowns fly,
    Turn the Shoulder of Mutton upside down,
    And make the Fox cry.
     
    My White Horse shall smash the Gate,
    And make the Windmill spin,
    Knock the Hammer and Pincers down,
    And make the Red Lion grin.
The Bull became Collington's butchers (and, presumably, was once a combined butchers and pub) and faced the White Horse. The Shoulder of Mutton was a few doors west of the Bull and now known as Lindum House. The Fox was on the south side of Brook Street, almost opposite the Windmill.

Once upon a time the Fox…

But where were the Gate and the Red Lion? Hint: Probably not the Rose and Crown (which presumably opened after Potter wrote his ditty) which is shown on some of Philip Brown's photographs two doors to the west of the Three Crowns.


NEW!

Some online resources for history and archaeology

You may all be finding plenty to occupy you while staying at home, but if you'd like to explore some archaeological or historical sources online, you might like to dip into a few of these links compiled by Cynthia Brown and Matthew Morris for LAHS Newsletter May 2020.


NEW!

Earliest Wymeswoldians

Nick Hando, a WHO member, has resumed fieldwalking around Wymeswold. And discovered several prehistoric flint tools. Most of these are from the Neolithic to the Iron Age – such as the superb example of a scraper shown on the left.

But on the right is something else. It's not a 'tool' but instead the core from which small 'bladelets' were struck. It's the Stone Age counterpart to a box cutter with snap-off blades – just 'break off' a new piece of flint when the old one gets blunt or breaks. Flint cores are usually Mesolithic in date, making them about 11,550–6,500 years old.

Thes finds indicate that for millennia people were camping in the same area (probably a clearing in the woodland) on a hill ridge looking down on the River Mantle – which may have been more like a shallow lake at the time (perhaps enhanced by beaver dam-making activities). An excellent base camp for hunting and fishing. So long as the bears, wolves, aurochs (massive cattle, now extinct) and wild boars which would have lived in the woodland kept away. 'Normal' was different back then…

      

Many thanks to Nick for permission to share.


NEW!

Loughborough History and Heritage Network

Some of you may recall the ambitious Loughborough History and Heritage Network, a collaborative project between Loughborough University and Charnwood Museum. The website went 'dormant' for a while but has now been taken over by Alison Mott who is revitalising and adding new articles and links. Among them is The Tale of the Plague at Cotes by Joan Shaw.

Also details of a book published early 2019 about Robert Bakewell the pioneering eighteenth century agriculturalist based at Dishley to the west of Loughborough.


NEW!

Rev Henry Alford

Phil Denniff recently came across a digitised biography of Rev Henry Alford complied by his wife, Fanny Alford, after his death Life, Journals and Letters of Henry Alford, D.D.: Late Dean of Canterbury edited by His Widow . It is, to put it mildly, 'compleatist'. If anyone fancies writing a summary of no more than a couple of thousand words then please email bobtrubs@indigogroup.co.uk – don't just do it without letting me know else there might be several people working on this, unbeknown to each other.

Alford's own writings included editing an equally comprehensive collection of John Donne's sermons, The Works of John Donne, which appeared in six volumes during 1839. Digitised versions are available online – Phil has prepared this list to help.

      

Left: Henry Alford   Right: John Donne.


NEW!

Skipwiths of Prestwould, Virginia

Those will good memories may recall Philip White's article about Whatever happened to the Skipwiths of Prestwold and Cotes? in The Wolds Historian No.2 (pages 11–15).

One of the descendents, Beverly Craige "Bev" Skipwith, was caretaker for the Prestwould Plantation in Mecklenburg County, Virginia (named after the family home in England). He was the youngest son of Austin L. Skipwith mentioned at the end of the TWH article.

Bev died in 2015 and a link to his obituary was kindly sent to the WHO by Steve Riggan, whose 10x great grandmother was Diana Skipwith Dale.

Bev Skipwith at the Clarksville Sesquesentenial celebration in the late 1960s, where he won the contest for best beard.


New – all over again

2000 Years of the Wolds

Nearly twenty years have elapsed since the WHO publication 2000 Years of the Wolds appeared in print. Since then many of the articles have resurfaced as web pages on this web site. However Spring 2020 seemed a good time to make the original available again. I have made no attempt to update any information (except references to the WHO website) as this booklet is already part of the history of the Wolds villages. However, where possible, black-and-white photographs in the printed booklet have been replaced by the colour originals.

Even if you own a copy of 2000 Years of the Wolds then do download the PDF to 'renew acquaintance' and see many of the illustrations in colour.

Download 2000 Years of the Wolds as a free 10M byte PDF.

In case you are wondering, sadly older WHO publications cannot easily be converted to PDF.


NEW!

RAF Wymeswold post-WWII

A detailed history of activities at Wymeswold airfield in the 1950s and 1960s has been prepared by Richard Knight, who grew up at the western end of the runways.

Most of the information is about the activities of the RAF and Fields Aircraft Services, although there is also lots of previously-unseen photographs taken in the winter of 1944 and during the build up to D-Day, and photographs taken during public open days.

RAF Wymeswold cover

In total there is almost 70,000 words and about 440 photographs. To make this into manageable downloads there are six free PDFs:

www.hoap.co.uk/who/raf_wymeswold_part1.pdf
1946 to 1954: Farewell Dakotas; 504 Sqn. Spitfires to Meteors

www.hoap.co.uk/who/raf_wymeswold_part2.pdf
1954 to 1955: Rolls Royce test fleet and sonic bangs; 504 Sqn. Meteors; RAFA Air Display; 56 Sqn Hunters

www.hoap.co.uk/who/raf_wymeswold_part3.pdf
1954 to 1955: Rolls Royce test fleet and sonic bangs; 504 Sqn. Meteors; RAFA Air Display; 56 Sqn Hunters

www.hoap.co.uk/who/raf_wymeswold_part4.pdf
Memories from members of 504 Sqn: On the ground and in the air

www.hoap.co.uk/who/raf_wymeswold_part5.pdf
1958 to 1970: Field Aircraft Services: civilian & military aircraft; No. 2 Flying Training School; Provosts & Jet Provosts

www.hoap.co.uk/who/raf_wymeswold_part6.pdf
1944: Frederick Dixon's images: of accommodation, Wellingtons, Hampdens, Horsas and C47s

There are also four videos about RAF Wymeswold by Richard Knight:

youtu.be/lto9rs86ZkY

youtu.be/S6rN9nWrQpI

youtu.be/7yj9Qb4Qjgo

youtu.be/dkNnEV4QLwc

Plus another video by Cerrighedd: youtube.com/watch?v=FTlMQkKvPkI


NEW!

Things to do

While the WHO's monthly meetings are in hiatus there is plenty to do!

This web site has over 100 web articles going back to 1990 and about 20 PDFs – including all four issues of The Wolds Historian. Simply scrolling down through this page will reveal more recent additions. Use the navigation column on the left of every page or the Google-powered search box to seek out something specific.

If you want to initiate some research then there's transcripts of the registers of who has been 'hatched, matched and dispatched' in Wymeswold. Or search through the WHO archive catalogue. Most of these files are in Word DOC format so use the 'find' function from within your word processing software.

If you need prompting for some ideas for projects then jump to here. We're still seeking recollections of Ivor Brown in his speedway days and shortly after (see below).

Thanks to good 'sleuthing' by Phil Denniff several books written by Henry Alford, Wymeswold's most famous vicar, have been tracked down as available for free online. As has a biography written by his widow. Anyone want to write a short article summarising his life and achievements? Most of Alford's published writings concerned the metaphysical poet, John Donne (1572–1631).

Did you know that there was once an Especially Sacred Grove somewhere along the Fosse Way to the east of Wymeswold? More details here.

And if all that reading is too much then there are YouTube videos about the Wolds and Leicestershire more generally.

Several 'projects' are close to completion. Details will be announced on this web site in the next few weeks and an email will be sent out to everyone of the WHO email list. If you're not already on the WHO's email list then please join.

Stay safe and very best wishes

Bob Trubshaw
Chair, Wolds Historical Organisation


NEW!

Sir Julien Kahn at Stanford Hall and a View from the Co-operative College by David Lazell

One of Heart of Albion's earliest booklets, first published in 1993, is now available as a free PDF.

When this booklet was first published in 1993 Stanford Hall was still in use as the International Co-operative College. And Sir Julien Kahn's impressive 'makeover' had been merely fifty years before. Now, after a 300 million transformation Stanford Hall has become the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre.

The idyllic grounds of Stanford Hall look out over the Soar valley near Loughborough (although the Hall is just over the Nottinghamshire county border between Rempstone and East Leake). Bought by the furnishing trade magnate and philanthropist, Sir Julien Cahn, before the War and transformed into a showplace home, the Hall subsequently became the home of the Co-operative College. The contrast between these two owners makes the history of this building full of interest.

David Lazell describes both these eras, drawing upon his own experiences as a student at the College in the 1950s, combined with accounts from various members of staff who helped establish the standards for work and pleasure which went hand-in-hand. He describes Sir Julien's elaborate taste in interior decoration, his fondness for staging conjuring tricks, the names of the long-gone sealions – although their pool still survives – and above all his devotion to cricket. The early years of the Co-operative College, in its transition from Manchester to Stanford Hall, are brought to life with personal reminiscences and previously-unpublished photographs from the collections of the College and the author. They portray a vivid picture of an era of education that, to a great extent, has already been lost.

Download Sir Julien Kahn at Stanford Hall and a View from the Co-operative College for FREE (25 megabyte PDF)

Several of David Lazell's other booklets have also been republished as PDFs, including Spectacular at Stanford Hall, a precursor to Sir Julien Kahn at Stanford Hall and a View from the Co-operative College which contains some 'tales' not in the later publication.

Download Spectacular at Stanford Hall for FREE (3 megabyte PDF)

Download Sound of the Shawm – Recollections of East Leake and other kindly places nearby for FREE (6 megabyte PDF)
N.B. 'Other kindly places' include Wymeswold. (The link to the 1986 film about Charlie Firth is here www.macearchive.org/films/central-news-east-11081986-mini-museum.)

Download The Fairy Gift and other ways to find Lost Laughter – Faith in Fairies and other discoveries of green spirituality for FREE (7 megabyte PDF)

Download Rose Fyleman: Nottingham's ambassador from Fairyland
A salute to her verse and stories about fairies and remarkable circumstances
for FREE (4 megabyte PDF)


Wymeswold Washdyke Community Orchard

Richard Ellison has compiled a short history of the development of the Washdyke field into a village amenity. No less than 63 committee meetings, mostly between between 2007 and 2015, involved a wide-range of villagers and funding organisations.

This is available as a free PDF: www.hoap.co.uk/who/washdyke.pdf

Planting day in autumn 2008 – it was very wet!

The minutes of AGMs, copies of questionnaires, spreadsheets about the trees, and a copy of a tree certificate will soon be added to the WHO archive.


 

lots of older news from the WHO

 


WHO 'projects'

Joan Shaw has picked up preliminary information on some local interest topics. Do any WHO members want to delve a bit deeper? Just the sort of amusement you might be looking for as the evenings draw in! You do not have to be a member of the WHO, or even live in the area, to help.

  1. The Sporting Magazine for August 1834 contains fragments from the life of James Ella of Wymeswold. No idea if The Sporting Magazine is available on line anywhere, there certainly isn't a copy in Loughborough Library. Anyone fancy tracking down a copy?
  2. In 1834 Joseph Perry took over the Three Crowns, John Tyers was probably the previous licensee. Can we find out more about these landlords and/or others at the Three Crowns?
  3. Wymeswold was one of the places that refused to pay church rates. This seems to a rate intended to be paid by all residents, whether C or E or Nonconformist. It seems some Wymeswold residents felt that the congregation of St Mary's should pay for its upkeep. Is any more information available?
And a reminder from a year ago:

Are you looking for a 'little project' to keep you amused? The WHO committee would like to increase the range of information available on this website and is aware of several opportunities to add information that will be of interest to members and those living 'wider afield'.

  1. Indexing the main topics in St Mary's Wymeswold Church Council Minute Book.
  2. Indexing the main topics in the Wymeswold school log books.
  3. The WHO has a photocopy of a printed broadside with the headline 'Horrid murder'. The dreadful deed took place somewhere in Wymeswold and the names of the alleged perpetrators are given, though not the name of the victim – a child. But we don't know which year this was published. Internet search engines shed no light. If you fancy a spot of 'sleuthing' through relevant parish registers and court records then please get in touch with Bob Trubshaw. This would make a good project for someone new to doing local history research – Joan Shaw will happily provide advice.
  4. Contact the Women's Institute office in Leicester to establish what records they hold for the disbanded Wymeswold WI. As a follow up a short history of the branch's activities could be prepared. Ideally the person doing this would be a former member of this WI branch; if not Bob can put you in contact with one of the long-standing committee members.
And, last but not least, can you think of anything else which the WHO has yet to research? Especially if it relates to villages in the Wolds other than Wymeswold!

For further information – without making any commitment! – please email bobtrubs@indigogroup.co.uk


WHO publications

The WHO has published five booklets and two books:
  • A Portrait of Wymeswold Past and Present (1991)
  • A Walk Around Wymeswold (1994)
  • Wolds Reflections (1997)
  • 2000 Years of the Wolds (2003)
  • The WHO's What, When and Where (2007)
  • Bringing Them Home: The story of the lost sons of Wymeswold (2014)
  • Discovering the Wolds (2017)

A new book, People and Places of the Wolds, is expected to be published September 2020.

Copies of Bringing Them Home and Discovering the Wolds are still available. Please email bobtrubs@indigogroup.co.uk for further details.

In addition, between 1991 and 2002 an annual WHO Newsletter recorded details of the organisation's activities and research by members. All articles relating to Wymeswold from the WHO Newsletter are included in this Web site (see articles about Wymeswold's history). In 2004 the WHO Newsletter was replaced by The Wolds Historian which appeared annually until 2008.

Download Bob Trubshaw's extended look at Six Hills and Vernemetum The Especially Sacred Grove (2 megabyte PDF file)


WHO monthly meetings

MEETINGS CURRENTLY POSTPONED

The principal activities of the WHO are talks on the third Tuesday of September, October, November, February, March, April, May and June. During the summer there is a trip to a local place of interest while in January there is an annual meal followed by a short AGM.

See details of this year's programme below.

Meetings now take place in the Jubilee Room of Wymeswold Memorial Hall, Clay Street, Wymeswold, LE12 6TY and start promptly at 7.45 pm.

Non-members most welcome but will be asked to contribute 3.00. There is a lift to the Jubilee Room if visitors have difficulty with stairs.

For further information about WHO activities please phone 01509 881342.


Programme for 2020

Meetings take place in the Jubilee Room of Wymeswold Memorial Hall, Clay Street, Wymeswold, LE12 6TY and start promptly at 7.45 pm.

Non-members most welcome but will be asked to contribute 3.00. There is a lift to the Jubilee Room if visitors have difficulty with stairs. For further information about WHO activities please phone 01509 881342.

21st January  annual dinner and AGM
18th FebruaryMartin Tingle Digging the dirt: archaeology in the East Midlands and beyond
17th MarchPOSTPONED
21st AprilPOSTPONED
19th MayPOSTPONED
16th JunePOSTPONED
21st JulyPOSTPONED
18th Augustinformal social evening The Windmill, Brook Street, about 8 p.m.
15th SeptemberBob Trubshaw Ironstone quarries of Leicestershire
20th OctoberRoss Parish Holy wells of Nottinghamshire
17th NovemberPhil Thorpe A selection of toys from yesteryear
8th December
Note this is the second not the third Tuesday in the month
Eddie Smallwood Medieval medicine and herb lore