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Local history articles

Wymeswold

Burton on the Wolds

Hoton

Prestwold

Cotes

Six Hills


Wymeswold census returns 1841 to 1901

Wymeswold parish registers 1560 onwards

Wymeswold marriage registers 1560 to 1916


Village charities

Wymeswold Parochial Charities. Last century four separate village funds existed to help the poor and needy. These were the Town Lands and Herbage Charities, the Thompson Educational Fund, and Ballard's gift. In 1906 they were formally amalgamated and registered with the Charities Commission to form the Wymeswold Parochial Charities. Today the trustees appointed to administer the charities still endeavour to support cases of hardship in the village as well as to improve village facilities.

Revenue is derived not only from the least of fields, gardens, allotments and grazing rights on parish land, but also from interest gained on capital invested in Government Treasury Stock.

The largest expense is the winter gift to village pensioners. The trustees are obliged to transfer 100 to the Thompson Educational Fund to be spent on educational apprenticeships although more can be allowed should the need arise. Other grants are made to the Parish Fund, churches, Memorial Hall and the Playscheme.

The Allotment Charity is a much smaller charity, its revenue being derived from the rental of two fields: the 'Faulty Acre' on Six Hills Lane (so-called as it is not quite an acre) and the cemetery field. This revenue is divided wholly between village organisations such as the Brownies, Guides, Clubs, Scouts, church, chapel and Memorial Hall.

The Church Charities comprise four small charities administered by the vicar and churchawrden who, together with the PCC Treasurer, constitute the trustees. From two of these charities, established by Herbert Devereux Ward and Sarah N. Beasley and Rebecca F. W. Beasley, gifts are distributed to the elderly of the village. According to present record book, going back to 1932, these gifts were groceries, drapery, coal, etc., but by the late 1940s these had become monetary gifts. In 1989 these gifts on Christmas time where 10 for a single person and 15 for a married couple.

The two other charities – established by Rev William Chamberlain and Rev A Jobson – produce income which is used the occasional purchase of religious books for the church, Sunday School or day school.

The capital amounts invested with the Charity Commissioners from which income is derived are relatively small, viz. Ward's charity, 850; Beasley's charity, 534; Jobson's charity 45 and Chamberlain's 9.

Originally published in A Portrait of Wymeswold 1991.

Copyright Wolds Historical Organisation.

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